ODDPROPHET CHANGES EVERYTHING WE THOUGHT WE KNEW, WITH THE “ORACLE” EP!

Prophecy has accursed this day with a great ravager that lays havoc upon the audible plains of existence and forthcoming life to be. A great anger awakes from the bussing metropolis island that is the United Kingdom. One deity stirs this angst with a wizardry untold to the scripts of fate, bringing upon his own answers to this dreary world. This magician of frustration is the tear out legend known as Oddprophet, one of the immense powers that waves the Never Say Die flag. He brings to this universe a four track EP he calls the “ORACLE“. A harbinger of death and decimation, we go full recon on this thing to report what is approaching our reckoning.

To start, Oddprophet brings a collaboration to the plate with ground shattering up and comer, Vastive, in their track, “Dead Love“. Sequence kicks off with a long sweep into heavy metal guitar riff, ready to shake the bones of all living. Voices echo in radio chatter front to back in the mapping of this track, radiating for a larger delivery. Speed increases with added elements to fill the ambience of this track, and the voices gain body, becoming more comprehensive. Tension shifts into a screamo edition of metal genre for the attitude of this track. The vocal rises as the track charges up, then cuts into the primary bass cannon of a sound, briefly filtering, then fully attacking with hefty human growl, and the bass commences. Like a Gatlin gun of noise, the metallic clatter of sound design and percussive elements rip apart the listening space. This track defines any and all tear out dubstep standards, deepening the bar to the very center of a hellish other world. In the transition phase, the track picks up speed in the groove, and becomes more offensively angry than it’s previous half. The breakdown retaliates with the screaming yet again, and shreds into the same guitar, busting a massive riff, accompanied by triplets and an insane drum pummeling. Intensity rises again for the second drop, and commences with similar sound as the initial. Arrangement is flexed more this time, giving the flow a crushing advantage into the listeners threshold to release rage at it’s fullest. Drop number two ends and fades into a ambient darkness that echos the voices once more, and shades into silence.

A solo comes to be next, known as “British Gas“. Quickly to begin with a thriller styled arpeggiator, movement makes its way to yet another pluck of guitar strings, reigning in those heavy metal vibes yet again. Without a breath to inhale, the guitar rolls straight into the lead sound, which is a shriving cut of sound, slicing the intake of the listening ear, in the most enjoyable way. Accompanied with the famous Oddprophet grumbled, screech growl, and call and response of these sounds brings pure savagery to the audience taking attention to this madness. The word “Gas” projects as minor transient points of the drop. Climbing through, that hardy, pissed British rap performed by the mans, Illaman, takes head, absolutely sending the mood of this piece. Still followed by the massive sound produced by Oddprophet, the drop induces the purest of hate. Break takes a minor detox, only to ramp up yet again, with a more rapid succession of sound protrusion. This time coming in the a hefty riddim styled fusion of stomp and tear out presence, the pattern shakes the mid section of this track. Guns begin to rattle with a gnarly sustained attending the carry of this primary sound. Another break takes place, with sirens used to bring energy down, then ascend once more for a third body to heave its way into the pit. The third segment much similar to the first, with a stompy presence making atonement again. A solid punctuation to end this songs impact who ever took witness to it’s heathenism.

Another single shows it’s head, and it goes by the title of “Absolute Power“. War horns ascend the aesthetic off the rails with vintage static on the foley layer. Horns become grander and louder, with an added, seething grit shivering along the continuity of the body forming in this track. Swirling into a massive impact, which then cues rising claps, bestowing the drop soon to come. The pounce of the drop begins with a poppy, riddim pattern, that insights a very triggered goliath of a sound, that alarms a pungent growl. This track takes a bit slower progression for sound transformation, which each bit decisively made to complement the growth in it’s short lived change. A transition is made to a more advanced groove in the speech the call and response present. More elements begin to talk amongst themselves, making for a meeting of a very powerful volley of barraging waves. The title of this track, inexcusably speaks for itself, for it’s style is so unique in the way so much presence of varietal transient sounds collaborate in the soundscape. A break begins, with lead sounds of many origin carry the energy into what is to follow. A secondary body enters the field, with another mutation of flow. This time with a the machine gun aspect, reverberating between bars of distinguished change making way. No set of bars is the same whatsoever in this track, every piece is so specific to its own evolution. Truly a mind wrapper to say the very least. The song ends with the vintage tape crackle and a beam panning out.

Lastly, is my personal most intrigued piece of this EP, and that is super collaboration with DemonEyez, Speed Shift, and lyrics by Linda Tram, the song known as “Speed Demon“. A lighter conjunction pronounces the intro of this song, with minor chords making for a happier note to start, and Linda Tram’s lyrics announcing the song title in harmony. Pads glow in the distance, and fluted chords begin to develop as lyrics chop to rise with percussive elements taking place, giving an intense retro energy. A drum roll builds to the drop, phasing in sound entirely, and then it hits! Smacking down with a chirpy pluck, fermented with that signature growl to ignite each set, this one is a stage hopper for sure. The energy is bouncy, and a groove that tears the walls down. Much of the canny sounding designs that give a lot of emptied space, but allow the sound to really puncture the air with it’s significant presence. A transition takes place midway in, and the sound conforms with a second layer, expanding it’s width and heaviness, and diverging it’s arrangement. The break exits to the lyrics shadowing over again, and the chords pearling the fluted sound, then the main chorus takes place. A second round takes flight with the same lead sound, only increased lack of restriction for resistance, absolutely mashing the audible space to microbial sized fractures. The song ends with the chorus, and slows with harmonious chords. This song turned to be a well established platform for up and comers, DemonEyez and Speed Shift, both students of Oddprophet in the Defyre Program, a outlet for rising artists to hone their talents. Oddprophet has a reputation to be one of the most blunt and crucial critics, so it’s quite an honorable level up to have such an artist on your side to boost career tiers like he has for these two. A round of applause goes to all involved in this instance, making ground and conquering some many new dynamics on all fronts of music.

Oddprophet went above and beyond with himself in this insane projection of how he has evolved and adapted into what bass music is now. It is no unknown fact that this man advances the time sheerly on his own accord. Every track in this EP is a defined change in sound, with no hiccups whatsoever, and endless diversity. Super excited to have had the opportunity to be in a time where this exists, and can’t even begin to fathom what this lord will bring in the coming future.


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